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Dr. Anthony B. Miller, Professor Emeritus, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, discusses his extensive career in medicine, studying cancer.

Dr. Miller is the Director of the Canadian National Breast Screening Study as well as an independent research consultant. Dr. Miller’s research has covered many areas of his interests, such as the evaluation of screening for cancer, the epidemiology of breast cancer, non-communicable disease control, the environmental aspects of cancer etiology, control of
cancer, and more.

Dr. Miller talks about his extensive background in medicine, his tenure with the British Medical Research Council, and some of his work studying tuberculosis, then lung cancer. Through his research he came to the conclusion that treatment of diseases such as lung cancer was very inefficient, and thus the primary goal should be prevention of the disease
entirely. He talks about his pioneering work at the National Cancer Institute of Canada, as the director of the epidemiology unit, which he directed for fifteen years. He talks in detail about some of the research he was involved with, citing specific examples of research and testing with certain occupational groups who showed increased risk for certain cancers
due to the activities they performed regularly while working.

Dr. Miller talks about the various types of radiation that exist in our technological world. He talks about cell phone use, and radio frequency, and some of the international studies that have shown a link between usage and an increased risk of cancer. The research doctor talks about electromagnetic fields, and the potential risks, and some of the leading researchers in
this subject.

Dr. Miller talks about nutrition and how it affects cancer. He discusses some of the foods that may increase risks for certain cancers, such as increased risk for colon cancer from red meat consumption. He explains that stomach cancer risk can be reduced by a diet that is high in vitamin C, and he outlines other foods and their relative good and bad potential, in
terms of health and disease.

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