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Edward Sawicki Jr., MBA, Chief Executive Officer at Think20 Labs, LLC (think20labs.com), discusses his vision for the future of cannabis.

Sawicki’s mission is to help expand personalized medicine and ensure safety for consumers in the cannabis market. He is a cannabis advocate and is heavily involved in the education of consumers about the many benefits of cannabis. Sawicki has a rich background in the biotech space assisting with lab design for DNA-sequencing and molecular biology labs.

Sawicki talks about the premise of Think20 Labs and his background. He explains that Think20 Labs is much more than a testing company, that his company wants to encompass everything they know about molecular development and beyond. Think20 Labs is heavily involved in not only compliance testing, but the sequencing of DNA, epigenetic work, and so much more in research, and the design of projects as well. Sawicki explains that Think20 Labs seeks to get to the core of what cannabis can truly do to move medicine forward and help individuals who suffer from a wide variety of maladies. As he explains, full legalization is needed in order to expand the research.

The cannabis research expert talks about the individualized work they do with local growers, and the massive data that they are collecting about plants and soil conditions, etc. As he states, the most important issue right now is ensuring safety for consumers, and compliance. He discusses the dangers of products that come from the black market, and how full legalization with standards will help to improve safety.

Wrapping up, he talks about how research into epigenomic and RNA profiles will help them to figure out where the important correlations lie, in regard to understanding what they need to learn, and how to approach that in an ordered fashion. Sawicki states that by starting with genetic profiles of patients and of plants, their research can begin to find important correlations that will guide further research, ongoing.

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