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Monica M. Laronda, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology), provides an overview of her research work in endocrinology, reproductive biology, and 3D printed ovaries.

Laronda is passionate about research and she has a keen interest in the reproductive biology and endocrinology that forms the foundation for the the development of treatments to protect or restore hormone function and fertility. Laronda received her PhD from Northwestern University and her Postdoctoral Fellow work was done at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine (Obstetrics Gynecology).

Laronda talks about their main patient focus: childhood cancer survivors whose treatment or disease may have rendered them infertile later in life. She talks about bioprosthetic ovaries and the uses of 3D printing. As she explains, their early work has shown success in mice, and she discusses what that means for future research. The PhD explains how egg cells work, and the natural decline that happens over time, as well as how disease can affect them. She discusses the complexity of the ovary, and her lab’s research in which they investigated biochemical differences, etc. to assist in the development of the best bioprosthetics. She discusses transplanted tissue and how long it can last once transplanted.

The endocrinology expert explains their scaffolding models and her team’s hopes for further study. And Laronda provides information on the micro-environment, scaffolding proteins, etc. that play a role in cellular functions.

In this podcast you’ll learn:

How 3D printing is helping to advance bioprosthetic development
The importance of primordial follicles
How disease can impact fertility

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