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Mariano Vázquez, Ph.D., co-founder, and CTO of ELEM Biotech, discusses the many possibilities for testing and advancing treatments by utilizing virtual humans.

Mariano Vázquez, Ph.D., has spent many years as a prominent researcher at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center and he has worked in tandem with many multi-disciplinary, international researchers with diverse backgrounds spanning physics, mathematics, computer sciences, and engineering. By activating the most powerful supercomputers on the planet, researchers seek to gather a more sophisticated understanding of nature by developing a computational world for their ongoing research.

Vázquez talks about their work at ELEM Biotech. Their simulations of complex systems such as the human body, open up many doors for further research and testing. Overall the company is immersed in biomedical simulations, cloud, machine learning, the cardiovascular system, and the respiratory system, advanced medical devices, etc. Vázquez explains that while ELEM Biotech is interested in many areas of study and development, they are mostly focused on the cardiovascular system. Their information states… “Imagine a virtual human, not made of flesh and bones, but bits and bytes.”

As Vázquez explains, they create virtual humans with the goal of facilitating the testing of medical devices and pharmaceuticals, etc. Ultimately, virtual humans are created in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, where pharmaceutical companies, medical device manufacturers, etc. can test their products and fine-tune treatments to best-fit patients. In theory, so many devices and systems can be tested, from pacemakers to valve replacements, as well as stents and anti-arrhythmic drugs. Additionally, treatments for asthma, obstructive pulmonary diseases and so much more can be set up for study.

Vázquez talks about the future study they hope to approach. He explains the manner in which they develop their models and the relative complexity. He details how they combine systems to work in coordination. He further elaborates on their desire to link systems in a more advanced way, such as the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Vázquez explains also, the wonderful possibilities to test devices in relation to male versus female, for as he states a pacemaker, for example, is designed for both male and female, but the hearts are different.

Finally, Vázquez talks about the research and development they expect to delve into in the coming months and years

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